Brooks Koepka’s dad went after Brandel Chamblee on Twitter

Brooks Koepka

The season may have ended with Rory McIlroy winning $15 million at the Tour Championship, but there’s still plenty to talk about.

This week we have Bob Koepka, Brooks’s dad, going after Brandel Chamblee on Twitter.

Chamblee made a cheeky comment about something his wife, Bailey Mosier questioning whether he was a man or not on a long shot over a creek.

Not being able to resist, Koepka’s dad chimed in and immediately brought up Chamblee’s questioning of Brooks’s mental toughness.

Koepka’s reply is definitely warranted at this point. It’s quite clear that Brooks has proven he has the mental toughness to win any tournament he wants. He’s arguably the best player on the planet right now. Yes, even with McIlroy having a spectacular season, Brooks did what McIlroy couldn’t, he won a major.

Chamblee went on to explain what exactly he was questioning in regards to Brooks’s mental toughness, but it only led to a mention of the lesser-known Koepka brother, Chase, who was Brooks’s playing partner in the Zurich Classic and also a shot at Davis Love III’s son, Dru, who for some reason made 17 starts on the PGA Tour despite not having anywhere near a good enough game.

I’m on Bob’s side here.

Brooks choosing his brother as a partner at Zurich is fine with me. It’s only one event and the pair finished T22. Sure, had the duo won, Chase would have earned a two-year exemption on the back of his brother, but it’s not like he wasn’t out there hitting shots as well.

Love, meanwhile, was gifted exemptions into events based on his last name. Even his father, 1997 PGA Championship winner and former world number one, Davis worried that he was getting too many.

Per USA Today: “If he was Joe Blow, he could just go play,” Love said at the Sony Open, where he tied for seventh at age 54. “He wouldn’t get any spots, but now when he does get a chance … you know, just he tries too hard.”

It seems that Love believes his son would be better off doing things like everyone else.

“They said if Dru doesn’t make it through Q-school, we’ll give him a spot, too,” Love said. “I’d rather him be in the Bahamas.”

“He needs to play at his level,” Love said. “He doesn’t need to go up a level. He needs to be playing his way in Q-school. There’s nothing wrong with that. Thousands of kids do that.”

“I wish he wouldn’t take exemptions and go play somewhere else,” Love said. “He gets tempted. He played John Deere and Barbasol and it messed up his whole summer. He can get offers to go play the Challenge Tour in Europe. They love kids like that. He could have played a lot of tournaments. But he was gearing up to win Barbasol, or get a top 10 and get into the next week. It’s hard.”

While I don’t blame Dru for accepting the sponsor’s exemptions gifted to him, at this point, he has to realize that he isn’t ready for that level of competition.

And, to Bob’s point, Chamblee questioning whether Chase deserved to be in the Zurich – ONE TOURNAMENT – and not questioning any of Dru’s exemptions, is pretty suspect.

[HT SwingbySwing]